The mining newspaper for Alaska and Canada's North

Articles written by William L. Iggiagruk Hensley


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  • Willie Hensley ANCSA Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act Data Mine North history

    Alaska Natives utilize new corporate tool

    William L. Iggiagruk Hensley, Guest Writer|Updated Jan 6, 2022

    Pioneer Alaskans swore that Alaska's economy would be destroyed if "the Natives" secured control of any lands in Alaska. However, they did not realize how practical and pragmatic Alaska Natives have had to be to survive and thrive in their Arctic homeland. Whatever tool was needed to survive, Alaska Natives created it with the minimal materials at hand-skin, wood, stone, jade, copper, seashells, mud, plants, flint, obsidian, snow, and ice. With the settlement of Alaska Native... Full story

  • Willie Hensley ANCSA Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act UAA Data Mine North

    What Rights to Land Have Alaska Natives

    William L. Iggiagruk Hensley, Guest Writer|Updated Jan 6, 2022

    It is my good fortune to be asked to write a short piece on the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. My mother, Naungagiaq, would have been proud. She set me free to seek an education in a Tennessee boarding school when I was 14 – just at the time of my life that I could have been of help to her and the family in our hunting, fishing, and trapping world of the 1940s and 1950s. We had lived in three sod homes along the Little Noatak about a dozen miles from Kotzebue. She, in a... Full story

  • Willie Hensley ANCSA Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act Data Mine North history

    ANCSA: an impossible challenge achieved

    William L. Iggiagruk Hensley, Guest Writer|Updated Jan 6, 2022

    President Richard M. Nixon signed the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) in 1971, exactly 230 years after Captain Vitus Bering's Second Kamchatka Expedition finally sighted land in Alaska offshore from what is now Mount Saint Elias in 1741. In the years between, the 70,000 or so Unagan (Aleut), Sugpiaq, Yupik, Inupiat, Athapascan, Tlingit, and their descendants began to experience extreme changes brought on by Russian and American firepower, disease, religion,... Full story